Her Story of Domestic Violence


Since Julia Baird and Hayley Gleeson published, 'Submit to your husbands': Women told to endure domestic violence in the name of God (ABC News, July 2017), Fixing Her Eyes has received many emails from Australian women in evangelical churches who identified with the issues raised. Here we publish some of their stories. We hope that their words will be heard by all who read them. We hope that all readers will do something to help bring change. Whether you are in church leadership or part of the church. We can all do our part. No one should have to endure what these women have endured. We believe in, and pray to a God who is described in the following way in Psalm 91.4, "He will cover you with his feathers, and under his wings you will find refuge; his faithfulness will be your shield and rampart." Fixing Her Eyes welcome the windows being opened and the light shining in on this issue and believe that there is an opportunity for the church to better reflect the church Jesus calls us to be. May we listen to the Holy Spirit and may we listen to the testimonies of women. If you are experiencing Domestic Violence and are afraid for your safety call the National Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Counselling Service on 1800 RESPECT. If you are in immediate danger in your home, please call 000 (if in Australia). More contact details at the end of this article.

ACACIA: The domestic violence my ex husband used on me was physically sporadic, but other methods of control were constant. It took me many years to tell anyone what had happened and wasn't until I studied it at University that I realised the methods of control are an integral part of the DV cycle.

My ex husband was a pillar of the church. He was (still is) on many committees, was active in ministry and people think he is a charming, highly educated, godly man.

After years of deep friendship with the minister's wife in our church, I opened up to her about the fact he had hit me several times., Her response was "well it takes two to tango: what did you do to deserve it?".

Needless to say it took several more years to attempt to tell someone else. This time it was a minister we had known for many years who headed up a large church. He had heard (from my husband) that things were not going well in a marriage that had always been admired from the outside by other Christians. I was called to his office to explain myself.

Bravely, I told him the truth, naively assuming he would help protect me. Instead he told me to " forgive, get over it, and get it sorted out". He then announced our marriage "difficulties" to parish council and told them I was being stubborn in holding onto the hurt. No-one helped me, and I lost my church family because I was too embarrassed to continue attending there.

Still in the marriage two years later, I told a non Christian. I was believed and supported. This went well so I decided it was time to tell my Christian best friend. She said she "couldn't believe me" and refuses to hear anything bad against him to this day. It's a no-go zone in our friendship and she maintains contact with him.

Through all this my faith has wavered, but Jesus has never let me go. If only His church could show love like He does. I have lost a church, friends, and nearly lost my faith through this nightmare caused by DV, though no fault of my own.

BORONIA: He deliberately ran over a cat when we were engaged. You might think that was an obvious red flag and I was stupid to go ahead and marry him. I have thought that too - a thousand times. He wouldn’t look at me when he was saying his wedding vows. Perhaps I should have walked out then and saved myself the anguish of the ensuing years. He started the silent treatment on our honeymoon. For not buying him a snack that I didn’t know he wanted. A few months later, when my grandfather died, he stopped talking to me for three weeks. Because I had not consulted him about attending the interstate funeral. I just assumed it was okay to go. He also had a sex quota for every week. When I didn’t meet it, he punched me in the ribs and kicked me. I owed him sex according to the Bible verses he quoted to me. He made jokes about me to our friends. Over dinner. That I was frigid. Then he decided to go to Bible college. I took myself to a Christian counsellor. I told him that my husband thought I was frigid and that he hit me. The counsellor told me to keep forgiving him and that I needed to heal from the sexual abuse I had endured as a child. That would fix it. My counsellor told him about the sexual abuse in my childhood. Later my husband forced me to reenact the abuse because he was angry with me and he said he knew it was the best way to hurt me. He raped me a number of times. I refused to have anal sex but he forced that on me too. After two years of counselling my husband was still hitting me. I was crying through every counselling session. The counsellor said I was getting too depressed and needed a break from counselling. My husband was a student pastor by this time. He punched me on the way home from church because I hadn’t smiled enough. He punched me when I was taking a shower because I asked him about our finances. He threw furniture around the room when I refused to have sex with him. He drove dangerously to scare me. He would slam on the brakes if I asked him to slow down. He would race other drivers in the backstreets at night. One night he forced another driver into a parked car at high speed and kept driving. He threatened to drive me in front of a truck so that I would be hit on the passenger side. He drove up and down streets where prostitutes would stand waiting for clients. He would slow down and point them out to me. He told me I was ugly and useless. If I stood up for myself, he said I was arrogant. One day I found one of his study notebooks lying open and noticed my name. I kept reading. He had written that it would chill me to the bone if I knew about his fantasies. To rape prostitutes. To rape men. He also wrote that he had planned my murder. I asked him about the notebook when he got home. He took it from me and threw it in the fire. Then he told me how he was planning to kill me and if I tried to leave he would hang himself in the garage. He strung up a rope for that purpose. To remind me. For the next few days I went to bed early each night, pushing furniture up against the bedroom door so he couldn’t get to me. I decided to see another counsellor. When she heard my story she insisted that it wasn’t safe for me go home. I stayed with a friend and wrote a letter asking my husband to leave the house. He agreed. It was the middle of winter. When I returned to the house he had left all the doors and windows wide open. All the lightbulbs had been removed. He had also cleared our bank account. Over the next few weeks he stalked me. The police were quick to respond when I called. They urged me to get an apprehended violence order. The magistrate readily granted one. My Christian boss did not know what an apprehended violence order was and expressed surprise that I needed one. My Christian colleagues wanted to have a dinner party to try and reconcile us. My Christian grandfather (the one still living) wrote to me and told me I needed to go back and stick it out. My husband told people at church and Bible college that I had experienced a ‘mental breakdown’ and left him. No one from those places asked me what had happened. I wrote to the Bible College to tell them about my husband’s behaviour and my concerns for the safety of the women on campus. They did not respond. I went to another church where coincidentally one of the Bible College lecturers attended. He brushed me off when I tried to have a conversation with him. I tried another church. When the subject of my divorce came up I was told that I should never have left the marriage. That I should have endured the suffering as Jesus did. That I should have had the faith of Abraham. That there were no grounds for divorce except sexual infidelity. That I had sinned by filing for divorce. That I would never be allowed to marry again. My now ex husband went on to graduate from Bible college, remarried and worked as a church minister for many years. My story is not unique. Domestic violence in all its ugliness is frustratingly commonplace, and devastates the lives of many people in our communities. In light of recent discussions among Christians about domestic violence, I am compelled as a survivor to speak up. I hope that my story can shed more light on the issue of domestic violence so that effective strategies can be developed to address it. I also hope my story is of some consolation to others who are or have been affected by domestic violence. To those who care about this issue, I propose that it is not enough to address domestic violence as a problem in itself for often it only first layer of abuse. The second and subsequent layers of abuse are the unconscionable responses of people who are mandated to help and don’t. There is a phenomenon in which victims of domestic violence are often ignored and/or blamed and the actions of the perpetrators are denied and/or covered up. It is tragic enough that these layers of abuse occur in the wider community but when they occur as pervasively as they do in Christian contexts we need to ask some serious questions of our culture and leadership.

EUCALYPTUS: My mother is a very capable, intelligent and lovely woman. But within the Pentecostal movement in the 1980s, there was a push towards headship theology. It was difficult to argue towards autonomy for intelligent women, particularly for their success in the workplace. Their main role was at home. Even now, most people older than me in our congregation refer to this construction as "the biblical view of marriage"... although of course my subsequent theological studies have helped me identify that "headship" as we know is a cultural matrix of ideas, many of which have been attached to the biblical text in recent times. I grew up in a terribly physically and verbally abusive environment, and my mother struggled to make it safe for us as she pursued her calling, or vocation. We were often used by my father to enact his disappointments about their "non-traditional" union. The more she succeeded, the more insecure he got. That's not really what I want to highlight here, but instead I want to speak about the reaction of Christian leaders when they found out what was happening in our home. One very prominent female pastor told me to "get over it" after I approached her after youth group. The previous night had been a particular turning point event in which I was dragged around the house by my hair and then verbally abused on and off for twelve hours. Before that, though, there had been plenty of signs. My pet name at home was "retarded" for about three years. Because of that pastor's response, I believed for many years that I was being too dramatic, and deserved this kind of treatment, because I should be able to just "get over it." Throughout that time, my parents' connect group and many other Christians from our church saw the way my father treated me and laughed at it. They all said nothing. Because of this I struggled with great fear at church. I shook for many years each time I took the stage to lead the worship team. I loved church, because I loved God. But it has never, ever, felt safe. About ten years later, my boyfriend's behaviour began to parallel my fathers and enraged, he threw me against a wall during a disagreement. I took this to another youth pastor and was told "but you said you loved him," as if this was in some way my own character flaw that I was dealing with. I had missed the signs and dated someone who I now had responsibility for, potentially for the rest of my life. Unsatisfied, I took this incident to over five pastors, but conveniently this boyfriend claimed to have "blacked out" and could not remember anything of the event. Additionally, many meetings were held to discuss the ways I had caused the violence, and I was not invited to them. This led to a chain of events that affected me really negatively, and have permanently scarred my reputation in some circles.

GERALDTON WAX: I entered my marriage 18 years ago from a Christian culture that taught that wives should leave all decisions to their husbands and treat their husbands’ decisions and directions as God’s will. I thought this was how God wanted me to live and it would glorify him if I obeyed my husband in everything, and I believed my husband was trying to love me like Christ loved the church. I didn’t see that my husband was taking away my agency in every detail of my life - choosing what I wore, what we ate, how I spent my time, how often I saw my family, what friends I could see - controlling me emotionally, socially, financially, and spiritually. I often felt unhappy, but blamed myself for not being a better wife and appreciating his care more. After we had children he became even more coercive, telling me when to feed the babies, change their nappies, put them to bed. He constantly criticised my parenting and anything I did around the house (I was a stay at home mum and very isolated) and I believed that I was a terrible wife and mother and he was wonderfully kind and patient to put up with me. For much of our marriage he was based at home as he was in ministry positions or studying for ministry, so he was always watching, directing and criticising what I did. He made me believe that this was because he loved me and I needed him to ‘manage everything’ because I was incompetent, and that I should be grateful for how devoted he was to taking care of me. I reached a point where I was heavily medicated because I believed that I had a major depressive disorder. Eventually he decided that I was a liability to his career, and began telling me that I needed to be locked away in a psych ward, or else that I should suicide, because he and my children would be better off without me. I felt really scared and confused and tried to get away to a friend’s place. But he found me, brought me home and raped me, and told me I couldn’t see that friend any more (she was the only person I felt I could trust as she wasn’t a Christian). I escaped again and got to a safe place where God brought me in contact with Christians who helped me see the abuse. It was really hard for me to see it clearly for a while after two decades of thinking he was the perfect Christian leader and husband, but it became much clearer after I left because of the obvious evil and deceitfulness in how he responded to the situation. I am now on my own and waiting for the family court process to take its course over the next few years. When I left he took me to court to get custody, arguing that he was a respected church minister and I was mentally unfit. As a result of the initial interim decision, my children spend the bulk of their time with him and they are very much under his influence and control, but when they are with me they can see that I am sane and happy, functioning well, holding down a full time job and surrounded by supportive family, friends and church. I’m thankful to be alive and I’m trusting God for my children’s safety and for our future.